Location

University of Windsor

Related Website

http://www.aub.edu.lb/main/Pages/index.aspx

Event Type

Presentation

Start Date

29-5-2013 1:45 PM

End Date

29-5-2013 3:00 PM

Description

This presentation explores Arab youth sexuality and the challenges of studying youth sexuality in the Arab world. 330 young adults (70% ages 18-25) completed an online survey that assessed their knowledge, experience, perceptions, and values related to reproductive health and sexual education, masturbation, virginity, sexual experiences and relationships, marriage, and sex and the internet. Participants primarily resided in Lebanon (79%), but respondents also included individuals from Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, and Morocco. The results indicate that Arab youth are getting more liberal with their ideas and some practices with the help of the internet; however, the influence of religion, family values and society is still omnipresent. The author concludes that sexual education is far from complete and needs inclusion in curricula in schools and with parents. Most important is to have a balance between sexual explorations, maturity and bearing of responsibility: the internet does not teach that, parents do.

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Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

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May 29th, 1:45 PM May 29th, 3:00 PM

Development, Knowledge and Perception of Sexuality among Arab Youth

University of Windsor

This presentation explores Arab youth sexuality and the challenges of studying youth sexuality in the Arab world. 330 young adults (70% ages 18-25) completed an online survey that assessed their knowledge, experience, perceptions, and values related to reproductive health and sexual education, masturbation, virginity, sexual experiences and relationships, marriage, and sex and the internet. Participants primarily resided in Lebanon (79%), but respondents also included individuals from Bahrain, Djibouti, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Palestine, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, and Morocco. The results indicate that Arab youth are getting more liberal with their ideas and some practices with the help of the internet; however, the influence of religion, family values and society is still omnipresent. The author concludes that sexual education is far from complete and needs inclusion in curricula in schools and with parents. Most important is to have a balance between sexual explorations, maturity and bearing of responsibility: the internet does not teach that, parents do.

http://scholar.uwindsor.ca/arabyouthsymp/conference_presentations/presentations/7