Title

Cell-surface cathepsin B: understanding its functional significance

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2003

Publication Title

Current topics in developmental biology

Volume

54

First Page

313

Last Page

341

DOI

10.1016/S0070-2153(03)54013-3

Keywords

Animals, Annexin A2 -- metabolism, Caveolae -- enzymology, Cell Compartmentation -- physiology, Humans, Neoplasms -- enzymology, Protein Transport -- physiology

Abstract

The majority of research involving cell-surface cathepsin B has stems from studies in cancer. Observations that implicate cathepsin B in malignant progression are its overexpression in tumors as compared to normal tissues, its redistribution from perinuclear lysosomes to peripheral vesicles, and its association with the plasma membrane. Secretion and relocalization of cathepsin B to the cell surface in tumor cells correlate with tumor progression and clinical outcome for cancer patients. Because of the extensive research conducted on cell-surface cathepsin B and cancer, this chapter focuses on the relationship between this enzyme and malignancy with respect to cathepsin B expression, trafficking, and localization. It characterizes the association of cathepsin B with the plasma membrane by discussing potential cathepsin B binding proteins and introducing caveolae as specific regions for the localization of cell surface cathepsin B. The chapter provides insight into the functional significance of cell surface cathepsin B as an active member of a proteolytic cascade that is postulated to be involved in tumor invasion.