Title

Evaluation of a social skills program for children.

Date of Award

2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Casey, J.

Keywords

Psychology, Social.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a social skills program designed to improve the behavior, social skills, and coping skills of children with learning disabilities. This type of program could also have potential benefits for children without LD who have social skills deficiencies. The current study focused on the impact of the 10-week Better Emotional and Social Times program delivered through the Windsor-Essex chapter of the Learning Disabilities Association of Ontario for 36 children (28 boys, 8 girls), 8 to 12 years of age, from Southwestern Ontario. These children completed pre- and post-treatment the Social Skills Rating System as a measure of social skills and the Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale as a measure of self-concept. T-tests were conducted comparing pre- and post-treatment scores on the inventories. Results indicated that significant improvements occurred in parent rating of assertion, cooperation, responsibility, internalizing behaviors, and social skills and problem behaviors in general. Improvements were found in the children's rating of intellectual and school status only. When examining subgroups, it was found that items indicating improvements in responsibility, internalizing behavior, hyperactivity, and overall problem behaviors were endorsed by parents of children with ADD/ADHD diagnoses. Parents of children with primary deficits in the verbal domain of cognitive functioning endorsed items indicating an improvement in cooperation, self-control, and social skills in general. For children with primary deficits in the nonverbal domain of intellectual functioning, parents reported a decrease in overall problem behaviors and improvements were found in child rating of cooperation. These results and their relation to previous research are discussed and limitations of the present study as well as suggestions for future research are also presented.Dept. of Psychology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis2004 .D78. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 43-03, page: 1007. Adviser: Joseph E. Casey. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 2004.