Date of Award

1993

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Political Science

First Advisor

Keenleyside, T. A.,

Keywords

Political Science, International Law and Relations.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

This thesis seeks primarily to analyze the views expressed on peacekeeping from March 1, 1992 to March 31, 1993 by Canadian elites, the press, Members of Parliament and government officials. After a brief introduction of the topic in Chapter One, Chapter Two examines the literature on peacekeeping from 1948 to 1992. This investigation reveals that the peacekeeping debate during this time period was narrowly focused on a limited range of peacekeeping subjects. As well, this chapter shows how major peacekeeping events spurred a change in opinion of informed servers on the utility of peacekeeping. Chapter Three discusses the methodology (content analysis) employed in analyzing the current debate on peacekeeping. Chapter Four sets out to examine the overall nature of the current peacekeeping debate. The findings indicate an precedented depth to the debate on peacekeeping. Many new themes were prominent in the discussion. In addition, older peacekeeping themes were debated from new perspectives. An increased interest was shown amongst observers in Canadian-related peacekeeping themes. The data also reveal, however, that a number of peacekeeping themes were neglected. Finally, decidedly mixed views are discovered on a continued Canadian presence in UN missions. Chapter Five analyzes each forum of debate separately. This chapter finds that while there was a similar amount of attention given to the most frequently discussed themes overall by each forum, a considerable divergence occurred on other themes. In addition, there were fairly sharp differences of opinion on Canada's participation in certain UN missions. Chapter Six concludes by offering a number of policy recommendations for the Canadian government in the peacekeeping domain. These prescriptions seek to ensure that peacekeeping will be a central component of Canada's foreign and defence policy in the future.Dept. of History, Philosophy, and Political Science. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1993 .F343. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 32-06, page: 1561. Adviser: T. A. Keenleyside. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1993.

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