Title

Functional characterization of human CAP2.

Date of Award

2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Physics

First Advisor

Hubberstey, A.

Keywords

Biology, Molecular.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Essential cellular processes such as cell motility, cell migration and endocytosis/exocytosis require a dynamic actin cytoskeleton. Actin filaments (F-actin) polymerize and depolymerize into monomeric actin (G-actin) in response to signals from the environment. Several different signaling pathways lead to changes in the actin cytoskeleton (e.g. Rac, RhoA, Cdc42). Cyclase Associated Proteins (CAPs) interact with monomeric actin and are conserved in many species. Humans have two CAP genes, CAP1 and CAP2. Previous studies have demonstrated a role for CAPs in regulating the actin cytoskeleton and a role in endocytosis/exocytosis through sequestration of actin monomers. The objective of this study was to determine the localization and regulation of human CAP2. Deletion and site directed mutagenesis mutants were constructed and immunoprecipitation reactions were performed with wild type and mutant HA epitope tagged CAP2. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)Dept. of Science. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis2003 .S85. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 43-05, page: 1669. Adviser: Andrew Hubberstey. Thesis (M.Sc.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 2004.