Date of Award

2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.Sc.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Towson, Shelagh (Psychology)

Keywords

Psychology.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Previous research suggests that bicultural individuals vary in whether they shift cultural interpretive frames when cued by the environment. The current study explored the roles of cultural competence and cultural motivation in the variations in response to cultural framing cues. Sixty-five bicultural Canadians of East or South Asian descent completed measures of cultural competence and motivation for both heritage (East or South Asian) and host (Canadian) cultures. Participants were primed with either heritage or host cultural cues using a word-search puzzle. Culturally congruent frames were assessed via participants' responses on a measure of individualism-collectivism at the self-construal level. Study findings suggest that individuals who scored high on measures of competence and motivation in the cued culture showed higher cultural congruence than those who scored low on competence and motivation. The findings are discussed in terms of the implications of differentiating competence and motivation in the acculturation and cultural framing literatures.

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