Date of Award

1994

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Hakim-Larson, J.

Keywords

Education, Educational Psychology.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

In the present study, the influence of several variables on parent-child agreement for child, mother, and father reports of child functioning were investigated. Variables included the specificity of the depression measure used, child self-reports of global self-worth, and parent reported pathology. Harter's (Harter, Marold, & Whitesell, 1991) model of the mediational role of self-worth as a risk factor of depression and suicidal ideation was also examined. This model was originally developed for use with adolescents but was tested with elementary school age children in this study. Ninety-two elementary school children (9 to 12 years of age), their mothers, and a subgroup of their fathers completed parent and child versions of the Self-Perception Profile for Children (SPPC: Harter, 1985a), the Social Support Scale for Children and Adolescents (SSSC: Harter, 1985b), the Dimensions of Depression Profile for Children and Adolescents (DDPC: Harter & Nowakowski, 1987), and the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI: Kovacs, 1992). Parents also provided self-reports of depression by completing the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI: Beck & Steer, 1987). Compared to previous research (e.g., see Achenbach, McConaughy, & Howell, 1987), agreement was not improved for children and mothers, children and fathers, or mothers and fathers. For example, the domain specific nature of the DDPC did not result in an improvement in agreement between informants over the more global CDI. In addition, children with low global self-worth and their parents were not observed to report greater parent-child agreement compared to children and their parents with high global self-worth on the SPPC, SSSC, DDPC, and CDI. While parent self-reports of depression on the BDI were positively related to parent reports of child functioning on two measures of depression, they were not related to child self-reports. Last, child and mother reports provided partial support for Harter's model of self-worth and risk factors associated with depression and suicidal ideation. These results support the use of child self-reports in the assessment process and in school-based screening programs for the early identification of children at risk for depression or other school related difficulties.Dept. of Psychology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1994 .C76. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 56-01, Section: A, page: 0141. Adviser: Julie Hakim-Larson. Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1994.

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