Date of Award

2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.H.K.

Department

Kinesiology

First Advisor

Martyn, Scott (Kinesiology)

Keywords

Health Sciences, Public Health.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Since the Canadian government became legislatively involved in sport in 1961, it has increasingly privileged high performance sport (HPS) initiatives over those associated with participatory sport and physical activity (PSPA). The emergence of Bill C-12, The Physical Activity and Sport Act (PASA), in 2003 brought with it many suggestions that government priorities could be shifting toward PSPA. An examination of selected policies, the legislative process that preceded the passage of PASA, and PASA itself reveals that HPS priorities continue to dominate the federal agenda. Additionally, utilizing an established framework for critical policy analysis, dominant legitimations and attributions were identified. Findings suggest that the most common attributions - a sport dispute resolution centre, access and equity for francophone athletes, and public financial resources for HPS - do not sufficiently address the most common legitimations - reproducing values and maintaining the health, fitness, and physical abilities of Canadian citizens.

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