Date of Award

2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Biological Sciences

First Advisor

Higgs, Dennis (Biological Sciences)

Keywords

Biology.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The retention of eggs and larvae in suitable habitat through periods of strong current is necessary for growth and development of many fish species. This thesis examines abilities of eggs and larvae to withstand current driven advection and investigates morphological and genetic drivers behind possible retention. In the first study, the water velocities required to remove walleye eggs from substrates and larvae from station were investigated. Substrate type had an effect on egg retention, and swimming speed increased throughout development. Morphology predicts 59% of variation in swimming ability of larval walleye. The second study utilized a full-factorial breeding design to examine the effects of parentage on the swimming performance of lake trout. Swimming ability differed across families and a female effect was determined. Together, these studies provide insight into the role of current in egg and larval advection and broadens the knowledge of parental effects on swimming performance in fish.

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