Title

Parental socialization of emotion and affect recognition in school-aged children.

Date of Award

2004

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Hakim-Larson, J.

Keywords

Psychology, Clinical.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

In the present study, parental socialization of emotions was examined in relation to children's ability to identify affect. Two hypotheses were examined, with the first positing that variance in children's affect recognition could be explained by examining parents' self-report of acceptance of their children's emotions and the second positing that variance in children's affect recognition could be explained by examining parents' self-report of expressiveness in the family. Thirty children ages 5- to 10-years-old identified emotions depicted in emotion-eliciting vignettes and in computer-displayed photographs of facial expressions. Vignette responses were measured for accuracy, while verbal responses on the computer portion of the task were measured for both accuracy and response time. Primary caregivers completed questionnaires eliciting demographic information, parental approach to children's emotions and parental expression of emotion in the family. Multivariate Analyses of Covariance controlling for child age and gender were utilized to examine each hypothesis. The findings indicated that while higher rates of DA might be associated with higher error response rates for anger vignette recognition, high DA was associated with lower error response rates for happy and sad facial affect recognition. There was a trend toward significance for higher rates of NSEF to be associated with lower disgust facial affect error percentage rates. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed in context of the limitations of the current study and suggestions are made for future research.Dept. of Psychology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis2004 .A33. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 43-01, page: 0321. Adviser: Julie Hakim-Larson. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 2004.