Title

Psychological survival: Selective coping strategies among Canadians of African descent responding to racial discrimination.

Date of Award

2006

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

Keywords

Psychology, Clinical.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The present study explores the selection of Africultural coping strategies (i.e., Spiritual-Centred, Collective, Ritual-Centred) and conventional Eurocentric coping strategies (i.e., Problem-Focused, Emotion-focused) among Canadians of African descent (N=190) responding to three types of racial discrimination (i.e., Interpersonal, Institutional, Cultural), and the relative importance of these strategies in managing psychological distress. The results indicated that Canadians of African descent utilize both Africultural and conventional Eurocentric coping strategies when responding to racial discrimination. However, preferences for these coping strategies depend on the type of racial discrimination being encountered. Preferences for conventional Eurocentric and Africultural coping resources in response to different types of racial discrimination were also found to have differential effects on psychological outcomes over the past year. Overall, the findings demonstrated that individuals of African descent are exposed to unique stressors that require them to effectively utilize a repertoire of mainstream and culture-based coping strategies in order to maintain psychological well-being.Dept. of Psychology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis2006 .J67. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 45-01, page: 0479. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 2006.