Title

Sewing and silence, sewing and struggle: Socializing women's work in Igloolik, Northwest Territories.

Date of Award

1994

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Social Work

First Advisor

Hedley, M.

Keywords

Sociology, Social Structure and Development.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The main issues addressed in the thesis are the past and present importance of sewing to women in Igloolik, N.W.T. and the contribution women make to household and community through sewing. Interviews were conducted with women of different age groups to obtain an understanding of the importance of sewing in the past, teaching and learning sewing skills in the camp setting, the transformation of these activities and women's work generally in the move to settlement life, and the importance that sewing still maintains today. When discussing sewing activities on the land it was suggested that women were continually sewing. The skills necessary to provide well made clothing were indispensable to a hunting way of life. The goal of women to open a sewing cooperative and their desire to teach sewing to younger women, provides an indication of the continuing significance of these activities. Sewing remains an important part of Inuit culture. It is of considerable economic importance and potential, and retains cultural significance for women. The economic, cultural and social importance of sewing are therefore explored in relation to the goal of women to open a sewing centre in Igloolik.Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1994 .M54. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 34-02, page: 0616. Adviser: Max Hedley. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1994.