Date of Award

2009

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Paivio, Sandra (Psychology)

Keywords

Psychology, Developmental.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

This study tested whether identity formation and emotional competence mediated the relationship between childhood maltreatment and adult love relationships, as well as explored the differential long-term effects of psychological abuse and neglect. The sample was comprised of 187 undergraduates. Measures were the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (Bernstein & Fink, 1998), the Family Expressiveness Questionnaire (Halberstadt, 1986), the Emotion Control Questionnaire-2 (Roger & Najarian, 1989), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (Bagby et al., 2007), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (Rosenberg, 1965), The Robson Self-Concept Questionnaire (Robson, 1989), the Relationship Scales Questionnaire (Griffin & Bartholomew, 1994), and the Relationship Questionnaire (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991). Path analysis was used to test the proposed mediational model. Emotional competence mediated the relationship between psychological maltreatment and adult attachment styles, while identity integration did not. Emotional abuse and neglect were both associated with a fearful adult attachment style and alexithymia in adulthood. Results support the importance of emotional competence.

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