Date of Award

1999

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Civil and Environmental Engineering

First Advisor

Madugula, M. K. S.,

Keywords

Engineering, Civil.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

In this investigation, the static response of guyed communication towers is investigated using two different finite element models (three-dimensional truss model, and an equivalent beam model), and a beam-on-non linear springs analogy. A comparison between the analytical techniques is presented for different loading levels. Results from the analytical models are verified by testing four scale model towers to collapse. The analytical techniques are also extended to prototype towers and conclusions are drawn regarding the suitability of the analytical models to the static analysis of such towers. A dynamic testing facility (shake table), suitable for testing of communication towers, was designed, built, and instrumented at the Structural Engineering Laboratory at the University of Windsor. This study presents the experimental investigation, testing facility set-up, construction of models, materials and procedures used for the static, free vibration, forced vibration, and ultimate load tests of guyed tower models. The facility was used to test five scaled guyed tower models under free vibrations and forced base motion. The tests substantiated the theoretical finite element techniques. The finite element analysis is applied to eight prototype towers subjected to free vibration and forced vibration motion. A parametric study on 33 towers is conducted to investigate the main parameters influencing the free vibration of these structures. Based on this parametric study, three empirical equations were derived to estimate the fundamental natural frequencies of the tower These estimated frequencies would be valuable in establishing the dynamic characteristics of the towers for use by design engineers. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 61-09, Section: B, page: 4867. Advisers: M. K. S. Madugula; G. R. Monforton. Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1999.

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