Date of Award

1991

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

Keywords

Psychology, Industrial.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The results provide support for the validity of the perfectionism and self-efficacy constructs, since higher levels of socially-prescribed and other-oriented perfectionism, as well as lower levels of self-efficacy, predicted levels of satisfaction in nurses. There was mixed support for the hypothesis that a higher number of job stressors would be related to levels of satisfaction, since significant negative correlations were only obtained between the number of stressors and job satisfaction scores. Overall, the best predictors of job and life satisfaction were likelihood of remaining a nurse, and socially-prescribed perfectionism, respectively. In addition, subjective analyses indicate nurses are most concerned about: their relationship with administrators, inflexible work schedules, the number of staff assigned to each unit, the level of cooperation among nurses on each unit, low wages, and the lack of prestige associated with their jobs. (Abstract shortened by UMI.) Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 31-01, page: 0460. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1991.

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