Date of Award

2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Nursing

First Advisor

El-Masri, Maher (Faculty of Nursing)

Keywords

Health Sciences, Nursing.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and beliefs of nurses regarding the seasonal influenza vaccine and how these beliefs and demographics predict individuals vaccination status. This comparative descriptive study was conducted using a cross section of nurses working at two acute care hospitals and one palliative care hospital in Windsor,ON during the 2009/2010 influenza season. A sample of 202 nurses participated in an online self-reported survey. Both univariate and multivariate analysis was completed for both the vaccinated and unvaccinated respondents. This study found that being vaccinated in the previous flu season was the strongest predictor of influenza vaccination in the current season. In addition, perception of increased job risk, perception of protection provided by the immune system, workplace clinics and campaigns, and convenience were all found to be independent predictors of influenza vaccination or intent to vaccinate in the current season.

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