Date of Award

2010

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Cramer, Kenneth (Psychology)

Keywords

Psychology, Clinical.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Research shows that traumatic events occur frequently within the general population. Posttraumatic growth (PTG), defined as personal and interpersonal improvements following the experience of traumatic events, has been the focus of positive psychologists for more than a decade. Few studies have asked how experiencing growth post-trauma relates to coping with later life stressors. The current study tested this relation and aimed to discover whether self-efficacy and rumination acted as mediators within a path model. Undergraduate students completed surveys regarding reactions to past traumatic events and coping strategies used for current stressors. The hypothesized model was found to be an adequate fit for the data. PTG predicted task-focused coping related to current stressors as well as recent rumination about a past traumatic event. Self-efficacy also positively predicted task coping, but was negatively impacted by rumination. The present findings will guide future research on recovery from trauma and practical outcomes of growth.

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