Date of Award

1993

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Philosophy

First Advisor

Lewis, John,

Keywords

Philosophy.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Immanuel Kant demands a "pure" ethics. The moral law is based, "not in the nature of man, nor in the circumstances of the world in which man is placed, but"a priori solely in the concepts of reason." The incentive to moral action ought to be reverence for the law itself; yet Kant introduces the concept of the summum bonum as a necessary extension of morality. This concept originates from the demands of practical reason which seeks not only virtue for its own sake, but also seeks the reward of future happiness in proportion to worth. Several critics have charged Kant with inconsistency because he promotes "duty for duty's sake", yet he allows happiness to play a role in his ethics. What follows is an examination of this role, and more specifically, an investigation of the purity of Kant's ethics in light of this role. ftn$\sp1$Immanuel Kant, Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals. Tr. H. J. Paton, (New York: Harper and Row, 1956). (429). Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1993 .O77. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 32-06, page: 1533. Adviser: John Lewis. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1993.

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