Date of Award

1998

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Ed.

Department

Education

First Advisor

Kellenberger, D.

Keywords

Education, Technology.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

This study investigated the relationship between inservice teachers' beliefs about computers and their levels of computer use. Teacher beliefs were constructed from five measures: self-confidence, self-competence, perceived value of computers, computer experience, and perceived likelihood of using computers under differential access to computers, programs, and a computer-knowledgeable individual. Levels of computer use were subdivided into three areas for which computers would be used: personal, teaching, and student learning. The sample consisted of 80 inservice teachers enrolled in inservice courses offered at the University of Windsor. Data was gathered at the end of September and at the beginning of October in 1997. A questionnaire served as the data collection instrument. Overall, three out of the five independent variables were found to be significantly related to the tested levels of computer use: self-confidence, perceived value of computers, and perceived likelihood of using computers under differential access to resources. Specifically, significant items were: (1) self-confidence in using a computer in general, for personal needs, and for work; (2) perceived value of computers for personal needs, creating instructional support materials, and classroom instruction in general; and (3) perceived likelihood of using computers under differential access to computers and programs. Perceived value of computers for classroom instruction in general was the only independent variable significantly related to levels of computer use for "student learning". Moreover, neither self-competence nor computer experience were significantly related to levels of computer use. Possible implications for inservice programs are suggested. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1998 .H46. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 39-02, page: 0343. Adviser: David W. Kellenberger. Thesis (M.Ed.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1998.

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