Title

The role of memory self-efficacy in memory performance and performance estimation accuracy in old age.

Date of Award

2001

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Orr, Robert,

Keywords

Psychology, Cognitive.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The present study explored several issues regarding memory self-efficacy (MSE) in old age. There were two specific goals. The first was to examine whether the relationship between MSE and memory performance is more accurately described as curvilinear rather than linear, with moderate levels of MSE being most conducive to performance. The second goal was to investigate whether interactive relationships between MSE and other components of metamemory are present in the prediction of memory performance and the accuracy of memory performance estimates. Measures of MSE, memory knowledge, strategy use, memory performance, and performance estimation accuracy were obtained for 95 community dwelling individuals, aged 65--95 years. General memory affect (positive, neutral, or negative) and reaction to the memory and aging stereotype were also assessed. Results did not support a conceptualization of the MSE/memory performance relationship as curvilinear, suggesting that this relationship is better described as linear. As expected, significant interaction effects between MSE and memory knowledge on memory performance variables were found, indicating higher levels of performance to be associated with higher levels of MSE, but only for participants exhibiting low levels of memory knowledge. Results support the idea that the MSE/performance relationship is best understood in the context of interactive relationships between MSE and other components of metamemory. No evidence was found indicating interactive relationships between MSE and other components of metamemory in predicting the accuracy of memory performance estimations. Results also indicated that higher levels of MSE were associated with more positive memory affect. Few participants reported internalization of the memory and aging stereotype, although those who did exhibited lower MSE. It is concluded that, in general, results support the notion that high levels of MSE are advantageous in terms of performance. Results also indicate, however, that the relationship between MSE and performance is complex and that high levels of MSE are not necessarily associated with higher levels of performance. The implications of this in the context of high MSE levels in old age are discussed.Dept. of Psychology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis2001 .W45. Source: Dissertation Abstracts International, Volume: 62-10, Section: B, page: 4815. Adviser: Robert Orr. Thesis (Ph.D.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 2001.