Date of Award

1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Chemistry and Biochemistry

First Advisor

McIntosh, J. M.,

Keywords

Environmental Sciences.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The results of this investigation show that the placement of air samplers for the accurate assessment of the concentration of airborne trace metals is critical. The collection of airborne metal laden particulate matter by filtration at different heights above the ground at three different locations in Windsor, Ontario, Canada demonstrated the importance of sampler placement. This air sampling strategy for investigation of airborne trace metals was modelled after that used by Ontario's Ministry of Environment and Energy for its "Cities of the 90's" air toxics program. This strategy included using a 47 mm Whatman 41 filter paper air sampling medium, and sampling the air at a flow rate of 25 litres per minute. The airborne metals examined in this research included Cu, Ni, Pb, Mn, Cd, and Cr. Of these six metals, only Cu, Ni, Pb, and Mn were present in Windsor's air at concentrations high enough to be of relevance to this study. On the basis of this study, it is recommended that further investigations be conducted with air samplers placed at other locations to test for stratification of trace metals in air. These locations should be close to point source of trace metals to investigate the influence of height on the observed trace metal concentrations. With the use of the appropriate instrumentation, other trace metals could be investigated such as Cd and Cr$\sp{6+}$. In addition, the configuration of the air sampling device should be investigated to determine how this influences the sampling of metal laden particulate matter from the air. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1995 .H46. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 34-02, page: 0698. Adviser: J. M. McIntosh. Thesis (M.Sc.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1995.

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