Date of Award

2012

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Ph.D.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Chung-Yan, Greg (Psychology)

Keywords

Psychology.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The number of organizations choosing to electronically monitor their employees is increasing. Many of these organizations choose to implement these systems without fully understanding what effect they will have on their employees' attitudes and behaviours. The current study explored how fairness perceptions associated with the use of electronic monitoring impacts the extent to which employees are willing to engage in two types of discretionary behaviours--organizational citizenship and withdrawal behaviours. A social exchange approach was adopted. Data were obtained from 208 employees working for a Municipal government, a Police department and a call centre. Results confirmed that perceptions of justice associated with the use of electronic monitoring affect employees' willingness to engage in both organizational citizenship and withdrawal behaviours. It was also found that the relationship between perceptions of fairness associated with the use of electronic monitoring and citizenship and withdrawal behaviours was mediated by perceived organizational support, organizational trust, and affective commitment. Overall, the findings of the current study contribute to our understanding of the factors influencing employees' willingness to engage in loyal boosterism and withdrawal behaviours when organizations electronically monitor their employees. Practical and theoretical implications are discussed.

Share

COinS