Date of Award

2012

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Sc.

Department

Biological Sciences

First Advisor

Sherah VanLaerhoven

Second Advisor

Les Shipp

Keywords

Biological sciences, Earth sciences, Dicyphus hesperus

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

One expected consequence of global climate change is an increased likelihood in extreme weather events, including higher amplitude temperature fluctuation. This work examined the effect of low and high amplitude temperature fluctuation on predation, foraging behaviour and longevity of Dicyphus hesperus Knight (Heteroptera: Miridae). Results indicate that temperature fluctuations do influence foraging behaviour and adult longevity but the degree to which these are influenced is affected by host plant species. The results from this work suggest that the role of temperature fluctuation should be considered in future research as constant temperature models may not be representative of what is currently occurring in nature (low amplitude fluctuations) or what may occur as a result of climate change (high amplitude fluctuations).

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