Date of Award

2013

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Miller, Carlin J.

Keywords

Psychology

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Despite the growing evidence that circulating sex hormones during puberty may help explain the subtle sex differences that exist in the symptom profile, neuropathology and clinical sequelae of ADHD, there is limited research in this area. The current study investigated how the timing of female pubertal maturation influences the extent of ADHD symptoms in a non-clinical female undergraduate sample (N=253). Participants completed a set of self-report rating scales examining pubertal onset, and ADHD symptoms and related deficits. Using logistic regression models, difficulties in attention, emotion regulation, psychosocial functioning and more risky behaviour were shown to significantly help classify those who reported having an earlier pubertal onset relative to their peers. That is, early puberty was associated with increased symptom endorsement on a variety of ADHD-related variables. Findings highlight the potential role of sex hormones during puberty in explaining the differences in gender prevalence rates of ADHD and symptom profiles.

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