Date of Award

2012

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Sociology and Anthropology

First Advisor

O'Connor, Daniel (Sociology and Anthropology)

Keywords

Criminology.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The current research study set out to examine and understand how rank and file police officers perceive their workplace practices as organized, mobilized and controlled. The impetus for research is to better appreciate the network form of organization and the way in which knowledge flow is exercised in the distribution of policing resources and the ordering of practice. Concepts of nodal governance and structuration theory establish a framework that is developed to understand rank and file police officer workplace practice in an organizational sense. It is argued that the traditional role of the rank and file police officer has become ambiguous as a multiplicity of agents and agencies are involved in the delivery of policing services. Therefore, it is imperative to consider how knowledge flow produces and reproduces the policing structure through the actions of rank and file police officers as they begin to understand the current environment of police work. Data are derived from interviews with rank and file police officers located in South Western Ontario, Canada.

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