Date of Award

2016

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.Ed.

Department

Education

First Advisor

Salinitri, Geri

Keywords

Elementary pre-service teacher education, Implicit Theories of Intelligence, Mindset, Science education, Self-efficacy in Science

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

Bandura’s (1997) theory of self-efficacy and Dweck’s (1999) implicit theories of intelligence (also known as “self-theory” and latter referred to as “mindset”), are explored in the context of pre-service elementary teachers teaching science. Many difficulties elementary pre-service teachers experience in teaching science interfere with student performance. In this study, literature reviews self-efficacy and self-theory individually and together as a means to explain the teacher-student performance relationship. Surveys were distributed to elementary pre-service teachers at the University of Windsor, and results suggest a significant positive relationship between high self-efficacy in science and a growth mindset. The study determined that the first year of University of Windsor’s B.Ed program does not influence mindset nor self-efficacy in science teaching. These findings are important in understanding teaching behaviours when teaching science.

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