Date of Award

2016

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Cramer, Ken

Keywords

asynchronicity, online disinhibition, self-disclosure

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

The present study involved the examination of asynchronicity in eliciting online self-disclosure. Using an experimental design with 94 participants, researchers investigated the extent to which self-disclosure levels were impacted by using an asynchronous versus synchronous mode of communication. Participants had either a synchronous or asynchronous online interaction with a researcher, who they were told was a fellow participant, in which they answered a series of increasingly personal self-disclosure questions. Participants’ self-disclosure levels were determined by raters who examined the transcripts as well as self-report questions participants completed after concluding the interaction. The results indicated that there were no significant differences between groups across depth, breadth, and decline-to-answer variables. The findings are interpreted within the context of online self-disclosure research and suggestions for future studies are made.

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