Date of Award

1995

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

M.A.

Department

Psychology

First Advisor

Frisch, G. R.

Keywords

Psychology, Clinical.

Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Abstract

A randomized telephone survey of gambling behaviour was carried out in the Metropolitan Windsor (Ontario) area. The survey, which was based on the South Oaks Gambling Screen, captured information on gambling activities, problem gambling behaviours and demographic characteristics. The lifetime prevalence of problem gambling and pathological gambling was found to be 2.6% and 1.6% respectively. The prevalence of problem and pathological gambling in the year previous to the study was found to be 1.4% and 0.8% respectively. Variables, such as attitude towards gambling, gender, family income and membership in a religious group were found to discriminate between gamblers and non-gamblers, but did not discriminate between non-problem gamblers, problem gamblers and pathological gamblers. Activity-related variables, such as percentage of family income spent on gambling and the number of different gambling activities engaged in, were found to discriminate between non-problem gamblers, problem gamblers and pathological gamblers. The number of different gambling activities engaged in declined with age, the percentage of family income spent on gambling activates remained constant with age, and the levels of problem and pathological gambling decreased with age. The decline in the levels of problem and pathological gambling with age appears to be due to increased control over gambling activities that develops with age. The implications of these findings are discussed.Dept. of Psychology. Paper copy at Leddy Library: Theses & Major Papers - Basement, West Bldg. / Call Number: Thesis1995 .G68. Source: Masters Abstracts International, Volume: 34-06, page: 2477. Adviser: G. R. Frisch. Thesis (M.A.)--University of Windsor (Canada), 1995.

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