Title

Additive, non-additive and maternal effects of cytokine transcription in response to immunostimulation with Vibrio vaccine in Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2012

Publication Title

Immunogenetics

Volume

64

Issue

9

First Page

691

Last Page

703

DOI

10.1007/s00251-012-0624-2

Keywords

aeromonas-salmonicida; atlantic salmon; body-weight; chinook salmon; Cytokines; disease resistance; Gene expression; genetic variance; hematopoietic necrosis virus; Immune system; innate immunity; lysozyme activity; Maternal effects; Non-additive genetic effects; Outbreeding depression; Quantitative genetics; rainbow-trout

Abstract

Estimation of quantitative genetic parameters is important for improving salmonid broodstock management in commercial and government hatcheries. Using a replicated 2 x 2 factorial breeding design (48 families and 192 individuals), we partitioned early immune response transcription variation into additive genetic, non-additive genetic, and maternal components in juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha). Transcription of four cytokine genes (IL1, TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL8-R) and two control genes (IgM and RPS-11) was measured relative to an endogenous control (EF1a) before and 24 h after immune stimulation with Vibrio vaccine. Additive genetic variation was not significant for cytokine transcription and heritability ranged from 0.44 (in pre-challenge IL1) to 0.04 (in post-challenge TNF-alpha). Non-additive genetic variance was significant in post-challenge IL1 (18 %) and TNF-alpha (12 %) while maternal effects contributed to pre-challenge cytokine transcription. Cytokine transcription co-expressed within but not between pre- and post-challenge states. The lack of additive genetic effects indicates that cytokine transcription is not a likely candidate for selection programs to improve immune function in Chinook salmon. Our results add to the growing evidence that non-additivity in salmon is common and contributes to our understanding of the genetic architecture of transcription. This indicates that transcription variation may act to maintain genetic variation and facilitate rapid adaptive response in salmonids.

Comments

This is an accepted manuscript version of an aritcle whose version of record was published in:Immunogenetics: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00251-012-0624-2