Title

Predicting seasonal influenza vaccination among Hospital-Based nurses

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2011

Publication Title

Clinical Nursing Research

Volume

20

Issue

4

First Page

422

Last Page

438

DOI

10.1177/1054773811409032

Keywords

adult, article, Attitude of Health Personnel, Cross-Sectional Studies, cross-sectional study, health personnel attitude, human, Humans, Immunization Programs, influenza, Influenza, Human, influenza vaccine, Influenza Vaccines, Nurses, nursing staff, Nursing Staff, Hospital, Patient Acceptance of Health Care, patient attitude, predictors, preventive health service, psychological aspect, risk factor, Risk Factors, seasonal influenza, statistics, utilization review, vaccination, workplace

Abstract

A descriptive cross-sectional online survey of a convenience sample of 202 hospital-based nurses was conducted to explore the factors associated with influenza vaccination. The findings suggest that the independent predictors of influenza vaccination were perception of job as a risk increasing factor (OR = 12.14; 95% CI [1.89, 78.08]), workplace vaccination clinics and campaigns (OR = 2.88; 95% CI [1.12, 7.38]), vaccination in the previous season (OR = 34.80; 95% CI [12.99, 93.28]), viewing vaccination as an inconvenience (OR = 0.22; 95% CI [0.07, 0.67]), and one's belief that the immune system provides better protection than the vaccine (OR = 0.29; 95% CI [0.11, 0.77]). In conclusion, the findings support the existing literature with regards to low vaccination rates among health care providers. Furthermore, the identification of the predictors of influenza vaccination among nurses may assist administrators and policy makers with the implementation of evidence-based vaccination strategies. © The Author(s) 2011.