Document Type

Article

Publication Date

4-2007

Publication Title

Qualitative Market Research

Volume

10

Issue

2

First Page

183

Last Page

198

DOI

10.1108/13522750710740844

Keywords

handheld technologies, salespeople

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to propose that sales managers use mobile technologies in the working environment to communicate and supportively monitor sales person performance. Design/methodology/approach – A model of supervisor monitoring using mobile technologies is conceptualized that specifies the types of behaviours that promote high-quality working relationships, how mobile technologies increase the likelihood of work-to-nonwork role spill-over that may damage the relationship and why perceptions of supervisor fairness are critical. The paper concludes by presenting strategies for testing hypotheses and for researching mobile technology use by sales managers using qualitative and quantitative methods. Findings – Mobile technology use, supervisory monitoring, and relationship development co-exist in the current workplace. This research heightens awareness of how work-to-nonwork spillover may influence important outcomes of mobile technology usage. Perceptions of quality supervisor-employee relationships are important to retaining and motivating employees. As the workforce ages and skilled workers become more scarce, it is expected that this theoretical examination and ensuing future research will be interesting and important to the twenty-first century manager. Originality/value – This paper aligns research in the areas of leadership, monitoring and ubiquitous or mobile technologies. Previous leadership researches have questioned whether or not the use of different electronic monitoring tools affects the leader's ability to influence others. However, few researchers have examined performance-based monitoring using mobile technologies, although mobile technologies make it easier for sales managers to monitor non-traditional work arrangements (i.e. off-site or contracted work). Furthermore, past research has been inconsistent in explaining how employees view information-gathering or monitoring by their managers.

Comments

Available from Emerald at https://doi.org/10.1108/13522750710740844

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Business Commons

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