Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

ad socordiam, ad urgentiam, James Madison, second order intention, political rhetoric

Start Date

22-5-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

25-5-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

On April 4, 1918 Senator Overman urged his colleagues in the United States Senate to approve the Sedition Act of 1918 within two days. The paper outlines the context of the proposal, and argues that it involved a fallacy. An analysis of the fallacy is offered, and it is argued that in the study of political discourse it is often helpful to take the inner convictions of speakers into account.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Included in

Philosophy Commons

Share

COinS
 
May 22nd, 9:00 AM May 25th, 5:00 PM

Identifying a new type of fallacy in political discourse

University of Windsor

On April 4, 1918 Senator Overman urged his colleagues in the United States Senate to approve the Sedition Act of 1918 within two days. The paper outlines the context of the proposal, and argues that it involved a fallacy. An analysis of the fallacy is offered, and it is argued that in the study of political discourse it is often helpful to take the inner convictions of speakers into account.