Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

equivocation, informal fallacies, logic, translation problem, tu quoque

Start Date

22-5-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

25-5-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

In this paper I claim that the reason we are reluctant to call many informal fallacies fallacies of relevance is because we can interpret them as providing contextual information about how the argument is to be interpreted. This interpretative dilemma is that the logical form is determined in part by whether the analyst wishes to be charitable to the proponent or the opponent. The evaluation of the argument is nonetheless purely logical.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Reader's Reactions

John Casey, Commentary on: David Botting's "Interpretative dilemmas" (May 2013)

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May 22nd, 9:00 AM May 25th, 5:00 PM

Interpretative dilemmas

University of Windsor

In this paper I claim that the reason we are reluctant to call many informal fallacies fallacies of relevance is because we can interpret them as providing contextual information about how the argument is to be interpreted. This interpretative dilemma is that the logical form is determined in part by whether the analyst wishes to be charitable to the proponent or the opponent. The evaluation of the argument is nonetheless purely logical.