Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

democracy, economic fallacies, fallacy of composition, logical theory, meta-argumentation, oligarchy, parts vs. whole, Robert Dahl, Robert Michels, Seymour Martin Lipset

Start Date

22-5-2013 9:00 AM

End Date

25-5-2013 5:00 PM

Abstract

Although the fallacy of composition is little studied and trivially illustrated, some view it as ubiquitous and paramount. Furthermore, although definitions regard the concept as unproblematic, it contains three distinct elements, often confused. And although some scholars apparently claim that fallacies are figments of a critic’s imagination, they are really proposing to study fallacies in the context of meta-argumentation. Guided by these ideas, I discuss the important historical example of Michels’s iron law of oligarchy.

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May 22nd, 9:00 AM May 25th, 5:00 PM

The fallacy of composition and meta-argumentation

University of Windsor

Although the fallacy of composition is little studied and trivially illustrated, some view it as ubiquitous and paramount. Furthermore, although definitions regard the concept as unproblematic, it contains three distinct elements, often confused. And although some scholars apparently claim that fallacies are figments of a critic’s imagination, they are really proposing to study fallacies in the context of meta-argumentation. Guided by these ideas, I discuss the important historical example of Michels’s iron law of oligarchy.