Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Book Panel

Keywords

argumentation, audience reception, The Philosophy of Argumentation and Audience Reception

Start Date

20-5-2016 3:30 PM

End Date

20-5-2016 4:30 PM

Abstract

Without audiences there would be no rhetorical argumentation. Without audiences there would be no rhetoric. Without audiences there would be no argumentation. The importance of audiences for rhetoric and argumentation cannot be overstated. Thus, considering the constitutive necessity of audiences in our fields, it is strange, if not down right worrying, that we spend so few pages on researching audiences. Fortunately, Professor Christopher Tindale has addressed this lacuna in many publications, and now he has done it in a book length work on the Philosophy of Argumentation and Audience Reception (Tindale 2015) The thrust of the argument in his book is that “[t]heories of argumentation must not only have an appreciation for the importance of audience and a role for the concept, they must develop around it” (Tindale 2015, p. 19).

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May 20th, 3:30 PM May 20th, 4:30 PM

Imagine the Audience – On Audience Research in Rhetoric, Argumentation, and Christopher Tindale’s The Philosophy of Argumentation and Audience Reception

University of Windsor

Without audiences there would be no rhetorical argumentation. Without audiences there would be no rhetoric. Without audiences there would be no argumentation. The importance of audiences for rhetoric and argumentation cannot be overstated. Thus, considering the constitutive necessity of audiences in our fields, it is strange, if not down right worrying, that we spend so few pages on researching audiences. Fortunately, Professor Christopher Tindale has addressed this lacuna in many publications, and now he has done it in a book length work on the Philosophy of Argumentation and Audience Reception (Tindale 2015) The thrust of the argument in his book is that “[t]heories of argumentation must not only have an appreciation for the importance of audience and a role for the concept, they must develop around it” (Tindale 2015, p. 19).