Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

argument of composition, composition, Douglas Walton, economic reasoning, economics, fallacy of composition, John Woods, meta-argumentation

Start Date

2016 9:00 AM

End Date

2016 5:00 PM

Abstract

Woods and Walton deserve credit for including (in all editions of their textbook Argument) a discussion of “economic reasoning” and its susceptibility to the “fallacy of composition.” Unfortunately, they did not sufficiently pursue the topic, and argumentation scholars have apparently ignored their pioneering effort. Yet, obviously, economic argumentation is extremely important, and economists constantly harp on this fallacy. This paper calls attention to this problem, elaborating my own approach, which is empirical, historical, and meta-argumentational.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Philosophy Commons

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Economic Reasoning and Fallacy of Composition: Pursuing a Woods-Walton Thesis

University of Windsor

Woods and Walton deserve credit for including (in all editions of their textbook Argument) a discussion of “economic reasoning” and its susceptibility to the “fallacy of composition.” Unfortunately, they did not sufficiently pursue the topic, and argumentation scholars have apparently ignored their pioneering effort. Yet, obviously, economic argumentation is extremely important, and economists constantly harp on this fallacy. This paper calls attention to this problem, elaborating my own approach, which is empirical, historical, and meta-argumentational.