Document Type

Paper

Start Date

15-5-1999 9:00 AM

End Date

17-5-1999 5:00 PM

Abstract

Writing arguments in indirectly informative language can improve undergraduates' analytic and communicative competencies. A twofold support is offered. First, written examples are examined to show how producing such argument can develop one's practic al understanding of the cultural repertoire--a knowledge argued crucial to both the evaluative and the communicative uses of reasoning. Second, various articulations of the relation between practical understanding and communication are discussed: those o f Gadamer on the connection between hermeneutics and rhetoric; Ricouer on the continuity of the imagination, cognition, and feeling in metaphor; and work in cognitive psychology on the links among language, thought and culture.

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May 15th, 9:00 AM May 17th, 5:00 PM

On the educational value of arguing in indirectly informative language

Writing arguments in indirectly informative language can improve undergraduates' analytic and communicative competencies. A twofold support is offered. First, written examples are examined to show how producing such argument can develop one's practic al understanding of the cultural repertoire--a knowledge argued crucial to both the evaluative and the communicative uses of reasoning. Second, various articulations of the relation between practical understanding and communication are discussed: those o f Gadamer on the connection between hermeneutics and rhetoric; Ricouer on the continuity of the imagination, cognition, and feeling in metaphor; and work in cognitive psychology on the links among language, thought and culture.