Location

McMaster University

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

1-6-2005 9:00 AM

End Date

1-6-2005 5:00 PM

Abstract

It has been accepted for some time within Communication Theory that there are identifiable differences in how men and women communicate. This acceptance obtains both within the academic world and even more so within the realm of folk Communication Theory. I argue that the gender-identified differences run along distinct poles. The first major pole concerns the objectives meant to be achieved by argument: is it deciding who is right? Or, what the issue really is? Or, how a disagreement can or should be resolved? The second major aspect concerns the communi­cative tools used in settling differences and understanding positions. If the genders have different rules of communi­cation, which rules will be followed? What sorts of arguments and evidence will be allowed? If classically mascu­line criteria are applied, then how can classically feminine voices be heard? It is argued that these issues do not loom nearly so large when gender is not confused with sex.

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Jun 1st, 9:00 AM Jun 1st, 5:00 PM

Argument Use In Gendered Contexts

McMaster University

It has been accepted for some time within Communication Theory that there are identifiable differences in how men and women communicate. This acceptance obtains both within the academic world and even more so within the realm of folk Communication Theory. I argue that the gender-identified differences run along distinct poles. The first major pole concerns the objectives meant to be achieved by argument: is it deciding who is right? Or, what the issue really is? Or, how a disagreement can or should be resolved? The second major aspect concerns the communi­cative tools used in settling differences and understanding positions. If the genders have different rules of communi­cation, which rules will be followed? What sorts of arguments and evidence will be allowed? If classically mascu­line criteria are applied, then how can classically feminine voices be heard? It is argued that these issues do not loom nearly so large when gender is not confused with sex.