Location

McMaster University

Document Type

Restricted Access

Start Date

1-6-2005 9:00 AM

End Date

1-6-2005 5:00 PM

Abstract

Many standardized tests purport to measure reasoning or argumentation skills (among them, the Ennis-Weir, the International Critical Thinking, the California Critical Thinking and the Watson-Glaser tests). Yet many commentators remain skeptical of their validity. I will look at some of these tests from the point of view of the Toulmin model of argument, asking whether they satisfactorily test for the ability to understand and assess the components of argument it identifies, and whether it could usefully inform the future design of such testing instruments.

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Jun 1st, 9:00 AM Jun 1st, 5:00 PM

Testing with the Toulmin Model

McMaster University

Many standardized tests purport to measure reasoning or argumentation skills (among them, the Ennis-Weir, the International Critical Thinking, the California Critical Thinking and the Watson-Glaser tests). Yet many commentators remain skeptical of their validity. I will look at some of these tests from the point of view of the Toulmin model of argument, asking whether they satisfactorily test for the ability to understand and assess the components of argument it identifies, and whether it could usefully inform the future design of such testing instruments.