Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

6-6-2007 9:00 AM

End Date

9-6-2007 5:00 PM

Abstract

Contrary to current individualistic epistemology, classical rhetoric provides us with a pragmatical conception of ‘testimony’ as a source provided to the orator by the particular community in which he acts. In order to count as usable ‘testimony’, any linguistic instance must comply with specific rules of social sanction. A deliberate attention to the social practices in which ‘testimony’ is given and assessed may provide us with a more accurate view of its epistemological role.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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John E. Fields, Commentary on Olmos

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John E. Fields, Commentary on Olmos (June 2007)

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Jun 6th, 9:00 AM Jun 9th, 5:00 PM

Making it Public: Testimony and Socially Sanctioned Common Grounds

University of Windsor

Contrary to current individualistic epistemology, classical rhetoric provides us with a pragmatical conception of ‘testimony’ as a source provided to the orator by the particular community in which he acts. In order to count as usable ‘testimony’, any linguistic instance must comply with specific rules of social sanction. A deliberate attention to the social practices in which ‘testimony’ is given and assessed may provide us with a more accurate view of its epistemological role.