Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

6-6-2007 9:00 AM

End Date

9-6-2007 5:00 PM

Abstract

Most arguments can be presented in different forms, e.g. with explicit data or with an explicit inference license and, in the latter case, with a modus ponens- or a modus tollens-inference license. It is arguable that one form is more appropriate or effective with regard to a specific piece of argumentation than another. However, in this paper it is argued that with regard to analogical reductio ad absurdum argumentation, its alleged persuasive effect is due to a successful appeal to common ground and not to its form.

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Takuzo Konishi, Commentary on Jansen

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Takuzo Konishi, Commentary on Jansen (June 2007)

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Jun 6th, 9:00 AM Jun 9th, 5:00 PM

Common Ground, Argument Form and Analogical Reductio ad Absurdum

University of Windsor

Most arguments can be presented in different forms, e.g. with explicit data or with an explicit inference license and, in the latter case, with a modus ponens- or a modus tollens-inference license. It is arguable that one form is more appropriate or effective with regard to a specific piece of argumentation than another. However, in this paper it is argued that with regard to analogical reductio ad absurdum argumentation, its alleged persuasive effect is due to a successful appeal to common ground and not to its form.