Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

6-6-2007 9:00 AM

End Date

9-6-2007 5:00 PM

Abstract

We know how people could reason well to resolve disputes. We don’t yet know why they don’t. Which theories we have applied to bridge that gap have had a profound influence on which practices we employ to resolve disputes. Dispute resolution ideally aims to promote good reasoning and good relationships. Is it possible to align theory more closely with practice to achieve both goals?

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Jan Sobocan, Commentary on Kloster

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Jan Sobocan, Commentary on Kloster (June 2007)

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Jun 6th, 9:00 AM Jun 9th, 5:00 PM

Reasoning in Dispute Resolution Practices: The Hidden Dimensions

University of Windsor

We know how people could reason well to resolve disputes. We don’t yet know why they don’t. Which theories we have applied to bridge that gap have had a profound influence on which practices we employ to resolve disputes. Dispute resolution ideally aims to promote good reasoning and good relationships. Is it possible to align theory more closely with practice to achieve both goals?