Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Start Date

3-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

6-6-2009 5:00 PM

Abstract

Is it possible to distinguish communities of arguers by tracking the argumentation schemes they employ? There are many ways of relating schemes to communities, but not all are productive. Attention must be paid not only to the admissibility of schemes within a community of argumentational practice, but also to their comparative frequency. Two examples are discussed: informal mathematics, a convenient source of well-documented argumentational practice, and anthropological evidence of non-standard reasoning.

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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David M. Godden, Commentary on Aberdein

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David M. Godden, Commentary on Aberdein (June 2009)

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Jun 3rd, 9:00 AM Jun 6th, 5:00 PM

Argumentation Schemes and Communities of Argumentational Practice

University of Windsor

Is it possible to distinguish communities of arguers by tracking the argumentation schemes they employ? There are many ways of relating schemes to communities, but not all are productive. Attention must be paid not only to the admissibility of schemes within a community of argumentational practice, but also to their comparative frequency. Two examples are discussed: informal mathematics, a convenient source of well-documented argumentational practice, and anthropological evidence of non-standard reasoning.