Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Restricted Access

Start Date

3-6-2009 9:00 AM

End Date

6-6-2009 5:00 PM

Abstract

There exists an organic parallel between rhetoric and democratic governance. This parallel can best be called “generative logos”—a term used by the Stoics. This helps explain why emotional motivation can, in democratic arrangements, help create stability. In this sense, it is generative logos that unites Plato and Aristotle on the instructive potential of rhetoric in the context of direct democracy—a political arrangement both philosophers, much like they did rhetoric, viewed as being amorphous.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Response to Submission

Manfred Kraus, Commentary on Shirali

Reader's Reactions

Manfred Kraus, Commentary on Shirali (June 2009)

Share

COinS
 
Jun 3rd, 9:00 AM Jun 6th, 5:00 PM

Plato, Aristotle, and Generative Logos in Democratic Deliberation

University of Windsor

There exists an organic parallel between rhetoric and democratic governance. This parallel can best be called “generative logos”—a term used by the Stoics. This helps explain why emotional motivation can, in democratic arrangements, help create stability. In this sense, it is generative logos that unites Plato and Aristotle on the instructive potential of rhetoric in the context of direct democracy—a political arrangement both philosophers, much like they did rhetoric, viewed as being amorphous.