Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

begging the question, epistemic circularity, epistemic justification.

Start Date

18-5-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

21-5-2011 5:00 PM

Abstract

One finds a surprising number of defenses of the legitimacy of some kinds of question-begging (circular) arguments or beliefs in the literature. Without wanting to deny the importance of dialec-tical analyses of begging the question, what I do here is explore the epistemic side of the issue. In particu-lar, I want to explore the legitimacy of “epistemically circular” arguments and beliefs. My tentative conclu-sion is that epistemically circular arguments and beliefs are never legitimate.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Philosophy Commons

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Against epistemic circularity

University of Windsor

One finds a surprising number of defenses of the legitimacy of some kinds of question-begging (circular) arguments or beliefs in the literature. Without wanting to deny the importance of dialec-tical analyses of begging the question, what I do here is explore the epistemic side of the issue. In particu-lar, I want to explore the legitimacy of “epistemically circular” arguments and beliefs. My tentative conclu-sion is that epistemically circular arguments and beliefs are never legitimate.