Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

ad socordiam, deceptive communication, James Madison, second order intention

Start Date

18-5-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

21-5-2011 5:00 PM

Abstract

A type of ad socordiam is identified in its context, with data from debates on the Bill of Rights in 1789. The fallacy involves a hidden intention as a salient feature. The study examines the ques-tion of how inferences can be made about hidden intentions. Further, it examines the relation of the fallacy identified to another type of ad socordiam.

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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Philosophy Commons

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

“Those states … will hardly adopt them”: On a fallacy in political discourse in the summer of 1789

University of Windsor

A type of ad socordiam is identified in its context, with data from debates on the Bill of Rights in 1789. The fallacy involves a hidden intention as a salient feature. The study examines the ques-tion of how inferences can be made about hidden intentions. Further, it examines the relation of the fallacy identified to another type of ad socordiam.