Location

University of Windsor

Document Type

Paper

Keywords

Constitutive rhetoric, Online newspapers, Participatory web media, Political debate, Rhetor-ical citizenship, Vernacular rhetoric

Start Date

18-5-2011 9:00 AM

End Date

21-5-2011 5:00 PM

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an explorative pilot study of political debates among users on NYTimes.com, the online newspaper of The New York Times. The study shows how a number of insti-tutional and vernacular subject positions are constituted and challenged in the debates. This happens in a process characterized by a dialectic between, on the one hand, an institutional call in the technical framing and rhetorical initiation of the debates and, on the other hand, a vernacular response in the users’ com-ments. This process reflects a community deliberating not only collective action but also collective identity and, moreover, subtly indicates the community’s norms of rhetorical conduct in political debates and how they are negotiated.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

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Philosophy Commons

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May 18th, 9:00 AM May 21st, 5:00 PM

Deliberating collective action and identity: The dialectic of institutional and vernacular rhetoric in political debates on nytimes.com

University of Windsor

This paper presents the results of an explorative pilot study of political debates among users on NYTimes.com, the online newspaper of The New York Times. The study shows how a number of insti-tutional and vernacular subject positions are constituted and challenged in the debates. This happens in a process characterized by a dialectic between, on the one hand, an institutional call in the technical framing and rhetorical initiation of the debates and, on the other hand, a vernacular response in the users’ com-ments. This process reflects a community deliberating not only collective action but also collective identity and, moreover, subtly indicates the community’s norms of rhetorical conduct in political debates and how they are negotiated.