Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2009

Publication Title

Journal of Black Psychology

Volume

39

Issue

5

First Page

54

Last Page

65

DOI

10.1177/0361684311433283

Keywords

law students, assertiveness, racism, sexism, academic environment, peer relations, academic achievement

Abstract

On the basis of a cultural coping framework, the present study examined coping responses to racial discrimination among 190 Black Canadians. The study assessed the respondents' coping with both general (i.e., problem- and emotion-focused coping) and Africultural coping strategies (i.e., spiritual-centered, collective, and ritual-centered coping) across three different racial discrimination vignettes (i.e., interpersonal, institutional, and cultural discrimination). Furthermore, three individual and cultural difference variables, African self-consciousness, social desirability, and past race-related stress, were controlled in the analyses. As predicted, the results of the profile analysis and multivariate analyses showed that both general and Africultural coping were used by the participants in responding to all three types of discrimination. Additionally, differential coping patterns were found depending on the context of racial discrimination. Overall, the study suggests that Black Canadians are exposed to multiple race-related stressors that require them to adopt a flexible repertoire of general and culture-specific coping strategies.

Comments

This article was first published in the Journal of Black Psychology (http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0361684311433283) copyright SAGE Publications.

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