Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2009

Publication Title

Canadian Journal on Aging

Volume

28

Issue

2

First Page

135

Last Page

146

DOI

10.1017/S0714980809090187

Keywords

older adults, gender role, health function, self-reported health, androgyny, life satisfaction

Abstract

This study investigated the relationships among gender role and self-reported health functioning in a sample of community dwelling older adults. One hundred and two (55 female, 47 male) participants were recruited through seniors’ associations in Windsor, Ontario. Analyses of variance were conducted separately by gender to compare the self-rated physical health functioning, wellness, and life satisfaction of participants differing on classification of their gender role. For older women classified as androgynous, gender role exhibited significant effects on general wellness and life satisfaction, but not on self-reported physical health functioning. In support of Bem’s androgyny model of optimal adjustment, post-hoc analyses revealed that women who rated themselves as androgynous reported better overall wellness levels than their peers. Older men’s self-reported physical health functioning and general wellness did not differ significantly by gender role. Limitations and implications are discussed.

Comments

This article was first published in the Canadian Journal on Aging (http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S0714980809090187). Copyright Cambridge University Press.

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