Title

Barriers that prevent bystanders from intervention when witnessing sexual-violence

Streaming Media

Type of Proposal

Digital Poster

Start Date

29-3-2016 1:00 PM

End Date

29-3-2016 2:20 PM

Faculty

Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences

Faculty Sponsor

Dusty Johnstone

Lancer's Lair

1

Abstract

Bystanders can have a major influence on the outcome of potential incidents of sexual violence. However, research concerning bystander influence is quite limited because of the recent emphasis on this third position that falls outside the binary norm of victim and perpetrator. Qualitative research offers insight into the different theoretical explanations for bystander behaviour, and the underlying rape myths that are normalized in society and prevent people from taking action when confronted with sexual violence. I will be examining the work of Latane & Darley (1968) and how they used participant observation and focus groups to form their research about bystander apathy and diffusion of responsibility. My research will present an analytical review of qualitative research by examining barriers to bystander intervention. I will examine both the social and biological factors that influence bystander behaviour, but focus my analysis on the role of patriarchy, misogyny and hypermasculinity. I will also be considering Darwin’s theory of natural selection (Gould, 1982) and Hamilton’s model of inclusive fitness (1964) to explain altruism in humans and how that has been theorized to be a possible explanation for lack of bystander intervention. My analysis is further grounded in social psychological theory and examines the influences of other social factors such as diffusion of responsibility, social awareness and pluralistic ignorance that tie it altogether. Finally, based on this review I offer suggestions for how we can best educate and encourage others to engage in bystander intervention. Darley, J. M., & Latane, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: diffusion of responsibility. Journal of personality and social psychology, 8(4p1), 377. Gould, S. J. (1982). Darwinism and the expansion of evolutionary theory. Science, 216(4544), 380-387. Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behaviour. I.

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Mar 29th, 1:00 PM Mar 29th, 2:20 PM

Barriers that prevent bystanders from intervention when witnessing sexual-violence

Bystanders can have a major influence on the outcome of potential incidents of sexual violence. However, research concerning bystander influence is quite limited because of the recent emphasis on this third position that falls outside the binary norm of victim and perpetrator. Qualitative research offers insight into the different theoretical explanations for bystander behaviour, and the underlying rape myths that are normalized in society and prevent people from taking action when confronted with sexual violence. I will be examining the work of Latane & Darley (1968) and how they used participant observation and focus groups to form their research about bystander apathy and diffusion of responsibility. My research will present an analytical review of qualitative research by examining barriers to bystander intervention. I will examine both the social and biological factors that influence bystander behaviour, but focus my analysis on the role of patriarchy, misogyny and hypermasculinity. I will also be considering Darwin’s theory of natural selection (Gould, 1982) and Hamilton’s model of inclusive fitness (1964) to explain altruism in humans and how that has been theorized to be a possible explanation for lack of bystander intervention. My analysis is further grounded in social psychological theory and examines the influences of other social factors such as diffusion of responsibility, social awareness and pluralistic ignorance that tie it altogether. Finally, based on this review I offer suggestions for how we can best educate and encourage others to engage in bystander intervention. Darley, J. M., & Latane, B. (1968). Bystander intervention in emergencies: diffusion of responsibility. Journal of personality and social psychology, 8(4p1), 377. Gould, S. J. (1982). Darwinism and the expansion of evolutionary theory. Science, 216(4544), 380-387. Hamilton, W. D. (1964). The genetical evolution of social behaviour. I.